5 Halloween Pet Safety Tips in Wichita, Kansas

Time for Halloween tricks and treats again! Halloween has become an enjoyable holiday for children, adults, and yes, even pets. If you’re including your pet in the fun this year, consider their safety, as this time of year can actually dangerous for your dog or cat if you’re not prepared. Consider the following five pet safety tips from Bogue Animal Hospital in Wichita, KS so your feline and canine companions can have a safe and happy Halloween!

Halloween Pet Safety Tips in Wichita, KS

1. Choose Your Pet Costume Wisely

With the increasing popularity of Halloween, there are now hundreds of costume options for pets, but not all costumes are safe, so choose yours wisely. Thoroughly inspect every pet costume before you buy it to make sure there aren’t any loose or dangling pieces that can be easily chewed off or cause a tangle hazard. Also feel around for parts that could poke or scratch your dog or cat. Once you decide on a costume, try it on your pet for size to make sure it’s not too tight or too big. If time allows, have your pet practice wearing the costume a couple days before Halloween so they’ll have time to adjust to it before the big day.

2. Don’t Give Your Pet Candy

Many sweet foods, especially chocolate, can cause pets to become sick. Chocolate contains an alkaloid called theobromine that’s poisonous to pets, and the darker the chocolate, the higher the toxicity level. Some of the symptoms of chocolate toxicosis include diarrhea, vomiting, accelerated heart rate, and even seizures. The sugar substitute xylitol, which is common in candy and gum, is also toxic and can result in hypoglycemia if ingested. You may think that feeding your pet just a small amount of candy will be safe, but different pets react to these foods in different ways, so it’s best to just keep all the Halloween sweets away from your four-legged friend.

3. Make Sure Your Pet Has ID

Although this is important for all holidays, Halloween is the time of year when there tends to be an increase in lost pets, and sadly, many lost pets are never returned home, due to lack of identification. Make sure your pet’s ID tag is securely attached to their collar and that it’s up-to-date. You may also want to consider a microchip, which is a permanent device (about the size of a grain of rice) that can be encoded with your contact information and scanned by most animal shelters in Wichita, KS and all over the country.

4. Keep Your Pet Away From the Front Door

Although this Halloween pet safety tip typically applies to dogs, it can apply to cats, too, if your feline friend is the social type. Every time your front door opens for those costumed trick-or-treaters is an opportunity for your pet to escape if you don’t keep an eye on them. For your pet’s safety and for that of your visitors, keep your dog or cat away from the front door in a confined area during trick-or-treat hours.

5. Limit Your Pet’s Time Outdoors

With all the people who will be walking around outside at night on Halloween, this holiday can be a dangerous time for outdoor pets. Limit your pet’s time outdoors during this time of year and keep a close eye on them until it’s time for them to come inside. If you normally keep your pet outside, we recommend that you keep them inside until a couple days after Halloween for their safety.

If you have questions about these Halloween pet safety tips, or if you would like to schedule an appointment for your dog or cat, feel free to contact us at (316) 722-1085.

 

The Importance of Preventative Care for Pets

The Bogue Animal Hospital veterinary team emphasizes the importance of preventative care for all of our patients. Keeping your pet protected from pests and diseases is essential if your pet is to live a long, healthy life. We can help you determine an appropriate preventative care regimen based on your pet’s lifestyle, health status, and particular needs. We recommend that all pets be protected year round from pests such as fleas, ticks, and heartworm. We also administer vaccinations based on these criteria to protect them from disease.

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Preventative Health Care

Our pets age significantly faster than we do, so regular physical exams are even more important for them than they are for us. An annual check-up for a pet is equivalent to a checkup every three or four years for a human.  When we examine your pet regularly, we are able to identify potential health conditions early so that they can be treated in a timely manner. Regular examinations can also allow us the opportunity to establish your pet’s baseline health, which will make it easier for us to catch any deviations from the norm in future checkups. During your pet’s preventive checkup, we will examine them from nose to tail and everything in between including:

  • Blood pressure
  • Blood test (generally in older pets)
  • Ears
  • Eyes
  • Fecal test
  • Heartrate
  • Neurological system
  • Nose
  • Oral cavity
  • Organ function
  • Skeletal system and joints
  • Urinalysis (generally in older pets)
  • …and so much more

If you have questions about your pet’s health care needs, we invite you to visit our pet wellness page or contact our team for assistance.

Affordable Senior Wellness Program for Pets

 

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How old is your pet? Dogs and cats are considered seniors between 5 and 9 years of age, depending on the breed, and at this age, their health care needs change and require more attention. There are also many conditions that senior pets are more prone to, such as arthritis, diabetes, and dental disease. To accommodate these changes, Bogue Animal Hospital recommends that your senior pet see us at least twice a year. This will allow us to better monitor their health from visit to visit and to make any recommendations for treatment, if necessary. As a practice, part of our mission is to make it both affordable and convenient for you to care for your aging pets during those critical golden years. With our Senior Wellness Program for canines and for felines, we’re able to achieve that mission.

Each Senior Wellness Program stresses the importance of early detection of developing conditions, preventative maintenance, diet and exercise management, and problem management of existing conditions in senior pets. With breed-specific guidelines, each wellness program includes over 10 specific examinations and screenings. These include comprehensive physical and dental exams every six months and annual internal parasite testing, blood counts, and glaucoma screening—all at discounted rates, with enrollment in the program. The program also includes a treatment schedule to help you plan and budget for your pet’s senior care.

We’re proud to be your pet’s wellness through every life stage, and we encourage you to consider establishing a wellness baseline for them using our Senior Wellness Program. Schedule an appointment today at (316) 722-1085 to learn more, and thank you in advance for being proactive about your senior pet’s health. Your pet thanks you, too.

Holiday Safety Tips for Pets

Holly, Jolly and Oh-So-Safe! Of course you want to include your furry companions in the festivities, pet parents, but as you celebrate this holiday season, try to keep your pet’s eating and exercise habits as close to their normal routine as possible. And be sure to steer them clear of the following unhealthy treats, toxic plants and dangerous decorations:

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O Christmas Tree Securely anchor your Christmas tree so it doesn’t tip and fall, causing possible injury to your pet. This will also prevent the tree water—which may contain fertilizers that can cause stomach upset—from spilling. Stagnant tree water is a breeding ground for bacteria and your pet could end up with nausea or diarrhea should he imbibe.

 

Tinsel-less Town
Kitties love this sparkly, light-catching “toy” that’s easy to bat around and carry in their mouths. But a nibble can lead to a swallow, which can lead to an obstructed digestive tract, severe vomiting, dehydration and possible surgery. It’s best to brighten your boughs with something other than tinsel.

 

No Feasting for the Furries
By now you know not to feed your pets chocolate and anything sweetened with xylitol, but do you know the lengths to which an enterprising fur kid will go to chomp on something yummy? Make sure to keep your pets away from the table and unattended plates of food, and be sure to secure the lids on garbage cans.

 

Toy Joy
Looking to stuff your pet’s stockings? Choose gifts that are safe.

  • Dogs have been known to tear their toys apart and swallowing the pieces, which can then become lodged in the esophagus, stomach or intestines. Stick with chew toys that are basically indestructible, Kongs that can be stuffed with healthy foods or chew treats that are designed to be safely digestible.
  • Long, stringy things are a feline’s dream, but the most risky toys for cats involve ribbon, yarn and loose little parts that can get stuck in the intestines, often necessitating surgery. Surprise kitty with a new ball that’s too big to swallow, a stuffed catnip toy or the interactive cat dancer—and tons of play sessions together.

 

 

Forget the Mistletoe & Holly

Holly, when ingested, can cause pets to suffer nausea, vomiting and diarrhea. Mistletoe can cause gastrointestinal upset and cardiovascular problems. And many varieties of lilies, can cause kidney failure in cats if ingested.

Opt for just-as-jolly artificial plants made from silk or plastic, or choose a pet-safe bouquet.

Leave the Leftovers 

Fatty, spicy and no-no human foods, as well as bones, should not be fed to your furry friends. Pets can join the festivities in other fun ways that won’t lead to costly medical bills.

 

That Holiday Glow
Don’t leave lighted candles unattended. Pets may burn themselves or cause a fire if they knock candles over. Be sure to use appropriate candle holders, placed on a stable surface. And if you leave the room, put the candle out!

 

Wired Up 
Keep wires, batteries and glass or plastic ornaments out of paws’ reach. A wire can deliver a potentially lethal electrical shock and a punctured battery can cause burns to the mouth and esophagus, while shards of breakable ornaments can damage your pet’s mouth.

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House Rules
If your animal-loving guests would like to give your pets a little extra attention and exercise while you’re busy tending to the party, ask them to feel free to start a nice play or petting session.

 

Put the Meds Away 

Make sure all of your medications are locked behind secure doors, and be sure to tell your guests to keep their meds zipped up and packed away, too.

 

Careful with Cocktails
If your celebration includes adult holiday beverages, be sure to place your unattended alcoholic drinks where pets cannot get to them. If ingested, your pet could become weak, ill and may even go into a coma, possibly resulting in death from respiratory failure.

 

A Room of Their Own 
Give your pet his own quiet space to retreat to—complete with fresh water and a place to snuggle. Shy pups and cats might want to hide out under a piece of furniture, in their carrying case or in a separate room away from the hubbub.

 

New Year’s Noise
As you count down to the new year, please keep in mind that strings of thrown confetti can get lodged in a cat’s intestines, if ingested, perhaps necessitating surgery. Noisy poppers can terrify pets and cause possible damage to sensitive ears.

 

Source: https://www.aspca.org/pet-care/holiday-safety-tips