Holiday Safety Tips

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The holiday season is upon us, and many pet parents plan to include their furry companions in the festivities. As you gear up for the holidays, it is important to try to keep your pet’s eating and exercise habits as close to their normal routine as possible. Also, please be sure to steer pets clear of the following unhealthy treats, toxic plants and dangerous decorations.

Be Careful with Seasonal Plants and Decorations

  • Oh, Christmas Tree: Securely anchor your Christmas tree so it doesn’t tip and fall, causing possible injury to your pet. This will also prevent the tree water—which may contain fertilizers that can cause stomach upset—from spilling. Stagnant tree water is a breeding ground for bacteria, and your pet could end up with nausea or diarrhea should he imbibe.
  • Avoid Mistletoe & Holly: Holly, when ingested, can cause pets to suffer nausea, vomiting and diarrhea. Mistletoe can cause gastrointestinal upset and cardiovascular problems. And many varieties of lilies can cause kidney failure in cats if ingested. Opt for just-as-jolly artificial plants made from silk or plastic, or choose a pet-safe bouquet.
  • Tinsel-less Town: Kitties love this sparkly, light-catching “toy” that’s easy to bat around and carry in their mouths. But a nibble can lead to a swallow, which can lead to an obstructed digestive tract, severe vomiting, dehydration and possible surgery. It’s best to brighten your boughs with something other than tinsel.
  • That Holiday Glow: Don’t leave lighted candles unattended. Pets may burn themselves or cause a fire if they knock candles over. Be sure to use appropriate candle holders, placed on a stable surface. And if you leave the room, put the candle out!
  • Wired Up: Keep wires, batteries and glass or plastic ornaments out of paws’ reach. A wire can deliver a potentially lethal electrical shock and a punctured battery can cause burns to the mouth and esophagus, while shards of breakable ornaments can damage your pet’s mouth and digestive tract.

Avoid Holiday Food Dangers

  • Skip the Sweets: By now you know not to feed your pets chocolate and anything sweetened with xylitol, but do you know the lengths to which an enterprising pet will go to chomp on something yummy? Make sure to keep your pets away from the table and unattended plates of food, and be sure to secure the lids on garbage cans.
  • Leave the Leftovers: Fatty, spicy and no-no human foods, as well as bones, should not be fed to your furry friends. Pets can join the festivities in other fun ways that won’t lead to costly medical bills.
  • Careful with Cocktails: If your celebration includes adult holiday beverages, be sure to place your unattended alcoholic drinks where pets cannot get to them. If ingested, your pet could become weak, ill and may even go into a coma, possibly resulting in death from respiratory failure.
  • Selecting Special Treats: Looking to stuff your pet’s stockings? Stick with chew toys that are basically indestructible, Kongs that can be stuffed with healthy foods or chew treats that are designed to be safely digestible. Long, stringy things are a feline’s dream, but the most risky toys for cats involve ribbon, yarn and loose little parts that can get stuck in the intestines, often necessitating surgery. Surprise kitty with a new ball that’s too big to swallow, a stuffed catnip toy or the interactive cat dancer.

Please visit our People Foods to Avoid Feeding Your Pets page for more information.

Plan a Pet-Safe Holiday Gathering

  • House Rules: If your animal-loving guests would like to give your pets a little extra attention and exercise while you’re busy tending to the party, ask them to feel free to start a nice play or petting session.
  • Put the Meds Away: Make sure all of your medications are locked behind secure doors, and be sure to tell your guests to keep their meds zipped up and packed away, too.
  • A Room of Their Own: Give your pet his own quiet space to retreat to—complete with fresh water and a place to snuggle. Shy pups and cats might want to hide out under a piece of furniture, in their carrying case or in a separate room away from the hubbub.
  • New Year’s Noise: As you count down to the new year, please keep in mind that strings of thrown confetti can get lodged in a cat’s intestines, if ingested, perhaps necessitating surgery. Noisy poppers can terrify pets and cause possible damage to sensitive ears. And remember that many pets are also scared of fireworks, so be sure to secure them in a safe, escape-proof area as midnight approaches.

 

SOURCE: https://www.aspca.org/pet-care/general-pet-care/holiday-safety-tips

5 Halloween Pet Safety Tips in Wichita, Kansas

Time for Halloween tricks and treats again! Halloween has become an enjoyable holiday for children, adults, and yes, even pets. If you’re including your pet in the fun this year, consider their safety, as this time of year can actually dangerous for your dog or cat if you’re not prepared. Consider the following five pet safety tips from Bogue Animal Hospital in Wichita, KS so your feline and canine companions can have a safe and happy Halloween!

Halloween Pet Safety Tips in Wichita, KS

1. Choose Your Pet Costume Wisely

With the increasing popularity of Halloween, there are now hundreds of costume options for pets, but not all costumes are safe, so choose yours wisely. Thoroughly inspect every pet costume before you buy it to make sure there aren’t any loose or dangling pieces that can be easily chewed off or cause a tangle hazard. Also feel around for parts that could poke or scratch your dog or cat. Once you decide on a costume, try it on your pet for size to make sure it’s not too tight or too big. If time allows, have your pet practice wearing the costume a couple days before Halloween so they’ll have time to adjust to it before the big day.

2. Don’t Give Your Pet Candy

Many sweet foods, especially chocolate, can cause pets to become sick. Chocolate contains an alkaloid called theobromine that’s poisonous to pets, and the darker the chocolate, the higher the toxicity level. Some of the symptoms of chocolate toxicosis include diarrhea, vomiting, accelerated heart rate, and even seizures. The sugar substitute xylitol, which is common in candy and gum, is also toxic and can result in hypoglycemia if ingested. You may think that feeding your pet just a small amount of candy will be safe, but different pets react to these foods in different ways, so it’s best to just keep all the Halloween sweets away from your four-legged friend.

3. Make Sure Your Pet Has ID

Although this is important for all holidays, Halloween is the time of year when there tends to be an increase in lost pets, and sadly, many lost pets are never returned home, due to lack of identification. Make sure your pet’s ID tag is securely attached to their collar and that it’s up-to-date. You may also want to consider a microchip, which is a permanent device (about the size of a grain of rice) that can be encoded with your contact information and scanned by most animal shelters in Wichita, KS and all over the country.

4. Keep Your Pet Away From the Front Door

Although this Halloween pet safety tip typically applies to dogs, it can apply to cats, too, if your feline friend is the social type. Every time your front door opens for those costumed trick-or-treaters is an opportunity for your pet to escape if you don’t keep an eye on them. For your pet’s safety and for that of your visitors, keep your dog or cat away from the front door in a confined area during trick-or-treat hours.

5. Limit Your Pet’s Time Outdoors

With all the people who will be walking around outside at night on Halloween, this holiday can be a dangerous time for outdoor pets. Limit your pet’s time outdoors during this time of year and keep a close eye on them until it’s time for them to come inside. If you normally keep your pet outside, we recommend that you keep them inside until a couple days after Halloween for their safety.

If you have questions about these Halloween pet safety tips, or if you would like to schedule an appointment for your dog or cat, feel free to contact us at (316) 722-1085.

 

The Importance of Preventative Care for Pets

The Bogue Animal Hospital veterinary team emphasizes the importance of preventative care for all of our patients. Keeping your pet protected from pests and diseases is essential if your pet is to live a long, healthy life. We can help you determine an appropriate preventative care regimen based on your pet’s lifestyle, health status, and particular needs. We recommend that all pets be protected year round from pests such as fleas, ticks, and heartworm. We also administer vaccinations based on these criteria to protect them from disease.

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Preventative Health Care

Our pets age significantly faster than we do, so regular physical exams are even more important for them than they are for us. An annual check-up for a pet is equivalent to a checkup every three or four years for a human.  When we examine your pet regularly, we are able to identify potential health conditions early so that they can be treated in a timely manner. Regular examinations can also allow us the opportunity to establish your pet’s baseline health, which will make it easier for us to catch any deviations from the norm in future checkups. During your pet’s preventive checkup, we will examine them from nose to tail and everything in between including:

  • Blood pressure
  • Blood test (generally in older pets)
  • Ears
  • Eyes
  • Fecal test
  • Heartrate
  • Neurological system
  • Nose
  • Oral cavity
  • Organ function
  • Skeletal system and joints
  • Urinalysis (generally in older pets)
  • …and so much more

If you have questions about your pet’s health care needs, we invite you to visit our pet wellness page or contact our team for assistance.

Affordable Senior Wellness Program for Pets

 

Dog having ear examination

How old is your pet? Dogs and cats are considered seniors between 5 and 9 years of age, depending on the breed, and at this age, their health care needs change and require more attention. There are also many conditions that senior pets are more prone to, such as arthritis, diabetes, and dental disease. To accommodate these changes, Bogue Animal Hospital recommends that your senior pet see us at least twice a year. This will allow us to better monitor their health from visit to visit and to make any recommendations for treatment, if necessary. As a practice, part of our mission is to make it both affordable and convenient for you to care for your aging pets during those critical golden years. With our Senior Wellness Program for canines and for felines, we’re able to achieve that mission.

Each Senior Wellness Program stresses the importance of early detection of developing conditions, preventative maintenance, diet and exercise management, and problem management of existing conditions in senior pets. With breed-specific guidelines, each wellness program includes over 10 specific examinations and screenings. These include comprehensive physical and dental exams every six months and annual internal parasite testing, blood counts, and glaucoma screening—all at discounted rates, with enrollment in the program. The program also includes a treatment schedule to help you plan and budget for your pet’s senior care.

We’re proud to be your pet’s wellness through every life stage, and we encourage you to consider establishing a wellness baseline for them using our Senior Wellness Program. Schedule an appointment today at (316) 722-1085 to learn more, and thank you in advance for being proactive about your senior pet’s health. Your pet thanks you, too.

New Gadget Let’s You Play with Your Pet from Anywhere in the World

PETCUBE:

Petcube is a box with a laser pointer, speaker, and light that you can control from anywhere in the world via the Petcube smartphone app.

You control the laser by moving your finger around your iPhone or Android phone’s screen. Anywhere your finger moves, your pet will follow, as long as she likes lasers.

You can also take screenshots of the app and share them via Petcube’s social network. What’s more, you can make your Petcube open to the public, so you can let anyone play with your pet while you’re home or away.

To be honest, letting strangers get a view of your home when you’re away (or home) sounds kind of strange, so maybe you’ll just want to stick with the lasers.

 

SOURCE: https://www.yahoo.com/tech/2-new-gadgets-let-you-play-with-your-pet-from-107338896099.html

Holiday Safety Tips for Pets

Holly, Jolly and Oh-So-Safe! Of course you want to include your furry companions in the festivities, pet parents, but as you celebrate this holiday season, try to keep your pet’s eating and exercise habits as close to their normal routine as possible. And be sure to steer them clear of the following unhealthy treats, toxic plants and dangerous decorations:

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O Christmas Tree Securely anchor your Christmas tree so it doesn’t tip and fall, causing possible injury to your pet. This will also prevent the tree water—which may contain fertilizers that can cause stomach upset—from spilling. Stagnant tree water is a breeding ground for bacteria and your pet could end up with nausea or diarrhea should he imbibe.

 

Tinsel-less Town
Kitties love this sparkly, light-catching “toy” that’s easy to bat around and carry in their mouths. But a nibble can lead to a swallow, which can lead to an obstructed digestive tract, severe vomiting, dehydration and possible surgery. It’s best to brighten your boughs with something other than tinsel.

 

No Feasting for the Furries
By now you know not to feed your pets chocolate and anything sweetened with xylitol, but do you know the lengths to which an enterprising fur kid will go to chomp on something yummy? Make sure to keep your pets away from the table and unattended plates of food, and be sure to secure the lids on garbage cans.

 

Toy Joy
Looking to stuff your pet’s stockings? Choose gifts that are safe.

  • Dogs have been known to tear their toys apart and swallowing the pieces, which can then become lodged in the esophagus, stomach or intestines. Stick with chew toys that are basically indestructible, Kongs that can be stuffed with healthy foods or chew treats that are designed to be safely digestible.
  • Long, stringy things are a feline’s dream, but the most risky toys for cats involve ribbon, yarn and loose little parts that can get stuck in the intestines, often necessitating surgery. Surprise kitty with a new ball that’s too big to swallow, a stuffed catnip toy or the interactive cat dancer—and tons of play sessions together.

 

 

Forget the Mistletoe & Holly

Holly, when ingested, can cause pets to suffer nausea, vomiting and diarrhea. Mistletoe can cause gastrointestinal upset and cardiovascular problems. And many varieties of lilies, can cause kidney failure in cats if ingested.

Opt for just-as-jolly artificial plants made from silk or plastic, or choose a pet-safe bouquet.

Leave the Leftovers 

Fatty, spicy and no-no human foods, as well as bones, should not be fed to your furry friends. Pets can join the festivities in other fun ways that won’t lead to costly medical bills.

 

That Holiday Glow
Don’t leave lighted candles unattended. Pets may burn themselves or cause a fire if they knock candles over. Be sure to use appropriate candle holders, placed on a stable surface. And if you leave the room, put the candle out!

 

Wired Up 
Keep wires, batteries and glass or plastic ornaments out of paws’ reach. A wire can deliver a potentially lethal electrical shock and a punctured battery can cause burns to the mouth and esophagus, while shards of breakable ornaments can damage your pet’s mouth.

German Shorthaired Pointer Christmas edition

House Rules
If your animal-loving guests would like to give your pets a little extra attention and exercise while you’re busy tending to the party, ask them to feel free to start a nice play or petting session.

 

Put the Meds Away 

Make sure all of your medications are locked behind secure doors, and be sure to tell your guests to keep their meds zipped up and packed away, too.

 

Careful with Cocktails
If your celebration includes adult holiday beverages, be sure to place your unattended alcoholic drinks where pets cannot get to them. If ingested, your pet could become weak, ill and may even go into a coma, possibly resulting in death from respiratory failure.

 

A Room of Their Own 
Give your pet his own quiet space to retreat to—complete with fresh water and a place to snuggle. Shy pups and cats might want to hide out under a piece of furniture, in their carrying case or in a separate room away from the hubbub.

 

New Year’s Noise
As you count down to the new year, please keep in mind that strings of thrown confetti can get lodged in a cat’s intestines, if ingested, perhaps necessitating surgery. Noisy poppers can terrify pets and cause possible damage to sensitive ears.

 

Source: https://www.aspca.org/pet-care/holiday-safety-tips

 

Homeade Dog Treats Recipe: Pumpkin Biscuits

Ingredients
  • 2 eggs
  • 1/2 cup canned pure pumpkin puree
  • 2 tablespoons dry milk powder
  • 2 1/2 cups white or whole wheat flour
Directions
  1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees . In a bowl, stir together the eggs, pumpkin puree, milk powder and flour; add 2 tsp. water, or enough so that the dough just comes together.
  2. On a lightly floured surface, roll out the dough 1/2 inch thick. Cut into shapes with 1-inch cookie cutters. Gather the scraps, combine, roll and form more biscuits; repeat until all the dough is used.
  3. Place the biscuits 1 inch apart on an ungreased baking sheet. Bake for 20 minutes, then turn over and bake until hardened, another 20 minutes. Let cool on the pan for 5 minutes.

Recipe: Dog Earth Biscuits

2 cups garbanzo bean flour (easily made by grinding up dried chick peas, an excellent source of protein)
1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
1/2 C chopped carrots
1/4 C frozen peas (thawed)
2 tablespoons tomato paste
1 teaspoon turmeric
1 teaspoon dried basil
1 teaspoon oregano
1/8 – 1/4 C water

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Puree the carrots, peas, turmeric, spinach, tomato paste and water in a food processor. Add the flour, baking powder, basil and oregano, and pulse until blended. Coat an 8 by 10 inch pan with non-stick cooking spray and then lightly dust with regular flour. Place the dough in the pan, spread it out evenly and score into about 60 square pieces. Bake 30 minutes. Makes 5 dozen treats (11 calories per treat).

Heartworm in Cats and Dogs: Don’t Let This Parasite Worm Its Way into Your Pet’s Heart or Lungs



A growing number of veterinarians are asking pet owners like you to protect their dogs and cats from heartworm disease instead of gambling that they won’t get it.

Pets get heartworm disease from mosquitoes that are infected with parasites. One bite can introduce parasites into your pet’s body. Once inside the body, the parasites nest and reproduce, lodging in your pet’s lungs and/or the right sides of his/her heart.

Heartworm has recently been diagnosed in about 30 species of animals in all 50 states, and affects millions of indoor and outdoor pets. To curb the rising number of cases, the American Heartworm Society (AHS) is asking pet owners to take a more proactive role in preventing the disease.

“We have all the tools to prevent it,” said Tom Nelson, DVM, owner of AAHA-accredited Animal Medical Center in Alabama and president of the AHS. “It’s really shameful that we have all of these positive cases.”
Part of the problem is lack of education.

New studies indicate that heartworm disease affects cats and dogs in all areas of the country, which is why veterinary experts suggest year-round prevention in all areas.

The American Heartworm Society and the Companion Animal Parasite Council recommend that all pets receive year-round heartworm protection so that pets are protected every month. It is critical that doses not be skipped or intervals between doses be extended because this results in an unprotected time during which animals may be exposed to heartworm larvae.

Pets should also have annual heartworm testing by a veterinarian prior to prescribing a heartworm medication.

Ask For More Information

Some veterinarians hesitate to offer prevention to their clients because they believe the disease is not a problem in their areas, but AHS statistics tell a different story.

A map of the United States, available on the AHS website, shows red splotches in areas where heartworm disease has been diagnosed. At quick glance, the varying shades of red make it look like the map is bleeding.
Because heartworm disease is no longer restricted to warm, humid areas, AHS experts suggest year-round preventative medication in all states and recently launched a campaign titled “KNOW More Heartworms” with the American Association of Feline Practitioners. This campaign targets cat owners.

One goal of the campaign is to dispel the myth that indoor cats are not at risk, said James Richards, DVM, a feline specialist who teaches at Cornell University in New York. One-half to one-third of the cats with heartworms do not go outdoors, he said.

Experts say that only 3.9 percent of cats in the United States are on heartworm prevention while about 50 percent of dogs are on preventative medication.

In Minnesota, where heartworm has been a significant problem for years, Pierce Fleming, DVM, recommends year-round prevention for dogs. And he recently started recommending it for all cats.

“Mosquitoes can get inside too,” said Fleming, owner of AAHA-accredited Plymouth Heights Hospital, who urges cat owners – with indoor and outdoor cats – to use heartworm prevention.

Know the Signs

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has not approved any drugs to treat heartworm disease in cats, which is why the AHS is focusing on prevention.

Clinical signs or symptoms in cats include vomiting, weight loss, diarrhea, coughing and difficulty breathing. Because cats tend to be couch potatoes, with limited opportunity for activity, it can be harder to identify breathing problems, which are often misdiagnosed as asthma. Pet owners may also mistakenly assume that low energy levels, a symptom of heartworms, are a sign of aging.

Three drugs have been approved by the FDA to help prevent heartworm disease in cats and dogs when given on a monthly basis. Several doctors also like the fact that preventive drugs also help protect pets from zoonotic diseases – like hookworm – that can be passed from pets to people.

Pamela Nichols, DVM, owner of AAHA-accredited Animal Care Center in Utah, says that heartworm prevention is simply good medicine. She advises clients to put their pets on preventive drugs because it protects them from heartworms and a slew of other parasites that can be transmitted from pets to people.
Some parasites – like roundworm – can cause blindness in children. Although it is very rare, it does happen, and it can be prevented.

“I have two clients that have vision in only one eye because of roundworm (parasite) infections,” Nichols said. “Anybody who wants evidence that this happens [can] look at these two families,” she added.

This article originally appeared in PetsMatter Volume 2 Issue 2, published by the American Animal Hospital Association. Copyright © 2009 AAHA.
Revised and updated Dec. 18, 2012.

Traveling by Car With Your Pet

Are you taking a road trip with your pet? The team at Bogue Animal Hospital wants to help you ensure that your pet is safe! We encourage you to read the following useful article and contact us if you have questions about your pet’s travel safety needs.


Traveling by Car With Your Pet

Traveling with a pet usually involves more than putting the animal in a car and driving off, especially if you will be driving long distances or be away for a long time. The American Animal Hospital Association (AAHA) offers these tips to help you prepare for a car trip with your pet and make it go a little smoother.

If your pet is not accustomed to the car, take it for a few short rides before the trip. This can help keep your pet from becoming nervous or agitated, and may lessen the effects of motion sickness. If, after a number of practice trips, your pet continues to cry excessively or becomes sick, consult your veterinarian.

Buckling up is an important safety precaution for your pet. Many states now require that pets be restrained while in a moving vehicle, and restraints have several advantages. They help protect pets in case of a collision, and they keep pets from running loose and distracting the driver. They also keep pets from escaping the car through an open window or door. Cats and smaller dogs are often most comfortable in pet carriers, which can be purchased in various sizes at most pet stores.

Carriers give many animals a sense of security and familiar surroundings, and can be secured to the car seat with a seat belt or a specially designed carrier restraint. There are also pet restraints available that can be used without carriers, including harnesses, seat belt attachments, pet car seats, vehicle barriers, and truck/pickup restraint systems. No matter what kind of restraint you use, be sure that it does not permit your pet’s head to extend outside the car window. If pets ride with their heads outside the car, particles of dirt can penetrate the eyes, ears, and nose, causing injury or infections. Excessive amounts of cold air taken into lungs can also cause illness.

While packing for your trip, remember to throw in a few of your pet’s favorite toys, food and water bowls, a leash, and food. You should also carry a first aid kit for your pet, and know basic pet first aid. If your pet is on medication, be sure to have plenty for the trip — and then some. Dr. Walt Ingwersen, AAHA veterinarian in Whitby, Ontario, points out that veterinarians cannot write a prescription without a prior doctor/patient relationship. This means that in order to get any drugs, your pet will need to be examined first by a new doctor. This may be inconvenient if you need medication right away. Also, if your pet is on a special therapeutic diet, bring along an extra supply in case you can’t find the food in a strange area.

Stick to your regular feeding routine while traveling, and give your pet its main meal at the end of the day or when you’ve reached your destination. It will be more convenient to feed dry food if your pet is used to it.

Dispose of unused canned food unless it can be refrigerated. Take along a plastic jug of cold water to avoid possible stomach upset the first day, as new areas can have minerals or bacteria in their water supply that pets need time to adjust to. Give your pet small portions of both food and water and plan to stop every two hours for exercise.

Remember that your veterinarian is a good source of information about what your pet will need when traveling. Consider having your pet examined before you leave as well, to check for any developing problems. If an emergency occurs while you are on the road, you can call the American Animal Hospital Association at 800/883-6301 or visit our hospital locator for the names and phone numbers of AAHA veterinarians near you. Have your current veterinarian’s phone number handy in case of an emergency. Also, be sure to travel with a copy of your pet’s medical records, especially if the animal has a difficult medical history.

Some pets travel better while tranquilized. Tranquilizers can lessen agitation and motion sickness in pets traveling by car. Discuss this with your veterinarian. Your veterinarian may suggest giving your pet a tranquilizer three to four weeks before your trip to check the dosage and adjust it if necessary.

Find hotels, motels, and campsites that accept animals and book them ahead of time. “Vacationing with Your Pet” by Eileen Barish is a directory of pet-friendly lodging throughout the United States and Canada. Copies can be ordered by calling (800) 496-2665.

Learn more about the area you will be visiting. Your veterinarian can tell you if there are any diseases like heartworm or Lyme disease and vaccinations or medications your pet may require. A health examination following your trip should be considered to determine if any internal parasites (roundworms, hookworms, heartworms) or external parasites (ticks, fleas) were picked up in contaminated exercise or wooded areas. Also, be aware of any unique laws. Some places have restrictions on exotic animals (ferrets are not allowed in some cities), and there are restrictive breed laws in others, such as no pit bulls allowed. Your pet could be affected by these laws, so call ahead to the city or travel information bureau for more information.

To avoid losing your pet during a trip, make sure your pet is wearing an i.d. tag. To be doubly protected, consider having your pet tattooed or having a microchip implanted. “The more methods of identification, the better chance that the owner will be found,” says Dr. Ingwersen. Microchip databases are specific to the United States and Canada, so register your pet in both countries if you will be driving from one to the other. Dr. Ingwersen also suggests owners register the name and phone number of a relative who can identify the pet in case the owner can’t be reached while traveling.

It’s important to carry health and rabies vaccine certificates, particularly if you will be crossing the border into Canada, the US, or Mexico. All three countries allow dogs and cats to enter if they meet stringent entry requirements. Depending on the country, exotic pets may be allowed to enter, though they may need further documentation. Call the Agriculture Department or embassy of the country or state to which you are traveling for information on the vaccinations, documentation, fees, or quarantine that may be required to bring your pet into the country.

Most importantly, try to plan ahead for unusual or emergency situations. What you don’t need in the middle of a trip is one more thing to worry about. “People get into a panic if they don’t have enough medication for their pet, no appropriate documentation for travel to other countries, or money to pay for border fees,” says Dr. Ingwersen. “Be prepared by bringing a copy of your pet’s medical records, proper documentation and medication and knowing the laws going into the new city or country.” Preparation is the most effective way to help ensure a smooth, enjoyable trip for you and your pet.

Originally published by Healthy Pet.